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Working and learning on large 11’ x 14’ crappie paper.

Hand full of Makers and some big paper.

Sheets of blank paper taller than your thumb and to big for my backpack all screaming at me to get to work. For some reason the tooth and feel of this book is more attractive to me than the super thick and slick Bristol board book, or the 140lb cold press watercolor paper book. I’ve figured it out… it’s the same paper (but way bigger) as my first sketchbooks back when I was at DASH (design and architect senior high) in Miami. Mr. Milanez would hand them out like candy. I would burn through them in a few weeks, chewing them up. Nothing great but I couldn’t get over the fact that they just handed you another one.

red marker, girl on a bike
Super Fresh, I always wanted to ride like this.

What’s in the bag?

A bag full of markers and this book that reeks of high school made it easier to let go and have fun. I brought this bag with me thinking that I was going to do rock some ill outlines, pieces and fill-in, but I couldn’t get that started. Here are some bikes, dogs and other things that did come out.

Bag of markers
BAG-O_MARKERS
Drawing of Dog on colorful sheet
Clem the dog napping next to me while I work. She gets lots of time in my book by always being near by.

Why using crappie materials could be a good thing.

Drawing on kinda crappie and large paper changes something. I think it’s the need to ‘finish’ that usually comes with larger formats. That feeling is gone. Another weird thing, the markers which are great for filling in large areas felt limited on this large format. I would fill the whole page with color in my 8×10 black book (ask me to show you). So line work became super important. I tried incorporating washes but the cheap paper didn’t like that. So line work is king!

Lesson learned.

I’m still learning that I have lots of hang-up. Getting free and removing myself from the work is going to take a minute, it was easier with this book. The more I work, the more I understand (maybe). I need to practice F$#king up stretched canvases. Media surface shouldn’t hinder the work, but stretched canvas vs found cardboard influences my work in profound ways. Similar to working on post-it notes.

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What makes a monster.

Witch monster scares you most?

This is a doodle from my IPhone’s digital sketch book called, ‘Tiny Pink Sketchbook’, made with Paper 53. I doodle anytime I get a minute, most sketches are connected to the part of my brain that I can’t always talk too, until it draws me a picture. Lots of artist have verbalized this in different ways… enjoy.

The witch makes me wonder what makes them frightening? She has no claws, teeth, fur, muscles, or slim which makes her the most interesting monster. Drawn as ugly green women to make us shrink in our theater chair but looking closer she is now my favorite classic monsters depicted reading books. Smart girls make folks run in fear?

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What makes a monster.

‘The gravity of the earth is pulling me down.’, says Swamp Thing.

‘The best place to lay eggs?’ The slimy creature thinks as it watches you skipping rocks. ‘A host to houses my eggs, something warm and tasty.’ Swamp thing thinks as it silently slips into the cold dry air. Looking down at reflections in still eye. She smiles at you after your breath is gone, ‘What a happy nest this will make. I’m such a good mom.’ She smiles as you’re dragged under.

Kinda grossing myself out with this one.

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Large Doodling 11×14

Big clouds blow away to reveal a b-boy on a bicycle, chased by a dog who would’ve been happy with a bone, and a girl who likes robots.

And odd one eyed four legged kids, following friends who come from nowhere.

Today lots of work in my head that needs to come out.

Bag of markers

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